The Ultimate Death Valley Road Trip Guide

Death Valley National Park is unlike any other California park. It’s very dry and is known for being the hottest and lowest place in the world. Its hottest recorded day was 134 degrees Fahrenheit. Yup, that wasn’t a typo! The lowest part of Death Valley is 282 feet below sea level, making it the lowest elevation in the United States. Each sight is very different from each other. From the sand dunes to the salt flats to the badlands of Zabriskie Point. It’s one of the places I would definitely keep visiting.

I went to Death Valley for the first time last year. It was during their “super bloom,” a rare bloom of wildflowers that doesn’t happen often in Death Valley, and I visited again recently. There unfortunately was not much of any kind of “bloom” this time around but I was able to make some stops I didn’t get to make during my first camping trip the year before which inspired me to put together my ultimate Death Valley road trip guide…

Camp Out

To make the most out of your visit I recommend camping. There are a few campgrounds at Death Valley; the larger ones are Furnace Creek and Stovepipe Wells. I stayed at Stovepipe Wells campground. It’s the third campground you’ll see if you’re coming in from Lone Pine. There are no advance reservations for the campground. You find your campsite, park and pay for your site and buy your pass (if you don’t have a national park pass) at the kiosk. There is a general store in the same lot and across the street is the Badwater Saloon and Toll Road Restaurant if you need somewhere to cool off and grab a bite of non-camping food. You can also utilize the pool and showers for an extra fee. You just pay at the Stovepipe Wells Village Hotel lobby. Oh yes, if you don’t like camping you can stay at the hotel or the Furnace Creek Resort.

Information on all Death Valley campgrounds can be found here.

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Hiking Mt. Whitney and Applying for Permits Through the Lottery

Hiking Mt. Whitney is on the adventure bucket list for many outdoor enthusiast. With an elevation of 14,508 feet, Mt. Whitney is the tallest mountain in the 48 contiguous US states.

Mt. Whitney is a part of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and its trail starts in the Inyo National Forest and enters Sequoia National Park. The summit is also the southern end of the John Muir Trail, “JMT.” Climbing to the summit and back can be done in a day trip or an overnight backpacking trip. Permits are needed for this hike from May 1st to November 1st each year. You can apply for a permit during the Mt. Whitney Lottery between February 1st and March 15th. Lottery results will be available on March 24th.

Mt Whitney in the distance (photo by Monique Tejada, @m00niquee)

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Havasupai Falls Backpacking Guide

If you love chasing waterfalls, enjoy hiking in canyons, swimming in beautiful turquoise waters, and sleeping under the stars then Supai, Arizona should be on your adventure destination list! Supai is an amazing destination where you not only get to experience the famous Havasupai Falls but also Mooney Falls, Navajo Falls, Fifty Foot Falls, Beaver Falls, and more!

Havasupai Falls
Another one of Havasupai Falls because it’s just so beautiful
Beaver Falls from the Canyon

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The Best Things To Do in Oregon, In and Around Portland

I visited Portland, Oregon for the first time in the summer of 2016 and it was a delicious adventure. It’s a great place for those who love to explore the outdoors located just outside the city and an amazing food destination. There’s no shortage of things to do in and around Portland. Here are some of my favorite things I did along with some helpful tips for your trip.

Rent A Car and Get Outside the City

Just outside Portland is the Columbia River Gorge, a scenic canyon that stretches for miles between Oregon and and the state of Washington. If you’re driving from Portland heading east on the I-84 you’ll be driving alongside the Columbia River Gorge. This is the route to Oregon’s most well-known waterfall, Multnomah Falls. And you can stop along the way to visit other falls such as Bridal Veil and Wahkeena. Wahkeena is a smaller waterfall and is very close to Multnomah. It’s an easy half mile hike in and there’s hardly anyone in sight. Most the other waterfalls will be about a three mile hike in. So if you have the time and enjoy hiking I recommend visiting your favorite falls.

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The 9 Best Things To Do in Pai, Thailand

Pai, a small bohemian town located in Northern Thailand is a place you may or may not have heard of but I assure you if you go you’ll never forget. I had read about Pai when researching cities in Thailand. Knowing I would be visiting Chiang Mai, I wanted to check out what other nearby cities I could explore. I chose to stay one night and I’m so glad I did but my 24 hours were not enough.

Here is a list of the 9 best things to do in Pai…

Rent a Motorbike

While Pai may be a small town most of the outdoor activities are outside the city and best reached by a motorbike. Riding a motorbike is also the most affordable way to get around. For less than 200 baht you can rent a motorbike for 24 hours. Basic motorbikes start at 100 baht. Aya Service was the company I used and I opted for the insurance. It was an extra 40 baht and worth the peace of mind.

This pink motorbike was the last motorbike available at Aya Service. Lucky for me I do like the color pink!

If riding a motorbike isn’t your thing tour companies offer packages that take you to some of the amazing spots Pai has to offer.

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