The Ultimate Death Valley Road Trip Guide

Death Valley National Park is unlike any other California park. It’s very dry and is known for being the hottest and lowest place in the world. Its hottest recorded day was 134 degrees Fahrenheit. Yup, that wasn’t a typo! The lowest part of Death Valley is 282 feet below sea level, making it the lowest elevation in the United States. Each sight is very different from each other. From the sand dunes to the salt flats to the badlands of Zabriskie Point. It’s one of the places I would definitely keep visiting.

I went to Death Valley for the first time last year. It was during their “super bloom,” a rare bloom of wildflowers that doesn’t happen often in Death Valley, and I visited again recently. There, unfortunately, was not much of any kind of “bloom” this time around but I was able to make some stops I didn’t get to make during my first camping trip the year before which inspired me to put together my ultimate Death Valley road trip guide…

Camp Out

To make the most out of your visit I recommend camping. There are a few campgrounds at Death Valley; the larger ones are Furnace Creek and Stovepipe Wells. I stayed at Stovepipe Wells campground. It’s the third campground you’ll see if you’re coming in from Lone Pine. There are no advance reservations for the campground. You find your campsite, park and pay for your site and buy your pass (if you don’t have a national park pass) at the kiosk. There is a general store in the same lot and across the street is the Badwater Saloon and Toll Road Restaurant if you need somewhere to cool off and grab a bite of non-camping food. You can also utilize the pool and showers for an extra fee. You just pay at the Stovepipe Wells Village Hotel lobby. Oh yes, if you don’t like camping you can stay at the hotel or the Furnace Creek Resort.

Information on all Death Valley campgrounds can be found here.

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